September 23, 2016

Friends and I recently spent over £40 for an hour-stay at TGI Fridays. Some grumbled when they saw the bill, and some handed over their card expression-less.

Our salaries are virtually identical and we each have similar outgoings with a mirrored approach to money.

Yet why do some feel that bars are expensive?

Are Bars Expensive?

It’s a bit of a varied question as a vodka and coke can cost anything from £3-£10, depending on which city you’re in and if it’s a high-end bar.

It’s a bit of a varied question as a vodka and coke can cost anything from £3-£10, depending on which city you’re in and if it’s a high-end bar.

But, so often we hear customers reiterating the price to their friends, in which they reply with a shocked face. When they put their drinks down at the table, they announce “it was £5 for that one drink”.

There tend to people two reasons why people react like this. One being that they don’t see the value in spending £5, or the other being that they don’t appreciate their surroundings.

Though to customers, bars are expensive because you could buy a can of Pepsi for 50p, but from a venue it’s £2. But what they don’t realise is that that additional £1.50 has to help pay for:

  • Staffing costs
  • Resources and stock
  • Rent for the bar

What Bars Spend Money On

It’s a bit of a varied question as a vodka and coke can cost anything from £3-£10, depending on which city you’re in and if it’s a high-end bar.

Us bartenders can reassure that their money is well valued by pouring measures accurately, using the appropriate glass, perfecting the liquid to ice ratio and always delivering excellent service.

Aside from this, we can improve our surroundings to make people feel more comfortable. Is the music relevant to the typical customer who enters your bar? Rearrange furniture to provide a quiet and a fun zone.

So, to go back to the beginning of this article where me and my friends viewed the pricing different. They were expecting smaller meals with a reduced budget, but instead, they were greeted with more food and a higher cost.

In an American-style restaurant, that’s to be expected.

Make it apparent to your customers what they can expect from your bar. It’s okay charging £10 for a cocktail if it’s made with attention and detail and to your liking. It’s not if the ingredients aren’t high-quality and it’s not passed to you with a smile.

Plus, if the venue is amazing and you’re surrounded by dripping lights from the ceiling, quality speakers for music and the best mixologists in the city, customers don’t begrudge spending more on a drink.

Let’s give customers what they pay for to provide a world-class service every single time.